MVC revisit: Take two

I find that MVC is much easier to understand both at the conceptual level and at the implementation level if you think about it from the perspective of how you communicate with the Model.

  1. Control is the input to Model. Basically, the Control is responsible to take input from the user or the system and stransfer it to the changes in the Model; The View is merely there to render the changes from the Model; so it can be considered as the output from the Model. You should keep the business logic as much as possible inside the Model and leave Control/View simple and dandy.For Flex 3 (Halo) components, the way of input is realized by implimenting the “change” listener of the controls, like this:

    <mx:TextInput id="mTxt" change="mVO.txtValue = mTxt.htmlText;"/>

    In Flex 3, when you bind a model to a control, it is one-way communication, meaning the control will reflect the change whenever there is one in the model; but the control would not be able to change the model. That’s why we need to wire through the change listener to make this happen.

    The output is hooked up by setter methods in the Model. Whenever you detect some changes that are historical, you would notify your listeners.

    [Bindable]
    public function set myValue(v:int):void
    {
    _
    myValue = v;
    notifyListeners();
    }

    In ActionScript 3, we normally implement “notifyListeners” by way of dispatchEvent. Your client listens to the event and updates the View by querying the changes from the Model. You may want to have different types of events so that your listeners can respond differently. For example, you normally would invalidate properties of your component and regenerate all the renderers when the data provider has changed, besides doing other updates; and you don’t want to do this kind of heavy-lifting each time when changes occur on the “less important” members of the Model.

  2. Asynchronous data. Sometimes you may compose something like an HTTPService component into your Model so that it can request external data.The data that are requested by the Control at a lot of times are not immediately available, and normally you would not notify your listeners until they are ready (For example, parsed into an XMLList object that can be consumed by component’s dataProvider).
  3. Static members are available before non-static members of the objects. You can use static members to set some initial values of your member variables.
  4. When you smell spaghetti code in your Model, try to partition/refactor your Model into smaller Value Objects. Value objects are a good way to structure your data/make flat Model hierarchical.
  5. For larger projects, you may want to duplicate Model (or value objects) so that multiple client can access the same data. For example, in your main window of your AIR application, you initialize your model like so:

    public var chatModel:ChatModel = new ChatModel();In another console window, you want to access the same model, like so:

    private var chatModel:ChatModel = Application.application.chatModel;

Advertisements

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: